Completely unrelated to Dry Cleaning, but still incredible…

We love interesting stories here at DeLuxe Dry Cleaners New Orleans, and this is very interesting! Click on the link for the full story.

http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-29209139

DeLuxe Dry Cleaners New Orleans Whales

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Fume Fading

Sometimes, we get items that come to us that are whats called “Fume Faded”. This means, not that our Dry Cleaning solutions fumes have faded your clothes, or that we smell really bad! It means that there is a type of color change usually on garments containing acetate, but some other fabrics may also be affected. The color change is usually found on exposed portions of the garment such as the shoulders and sleeves of a blouse, or the waist, or cuffs of pants.

“Fume Fading” color changes normally involve blue or green acetate turning a reddish hue. But sometimes other color changes can occur. The color change is found on both sides of the fabric, unlike sun fading which only affects the outer surface. Notice the slight Reddish tint in the pictures.

Its caused by some dyes used on acetate that are sensitive to the effects of nitrogen oxide gases found in our atmosphere (Crazy huh?!). These gasses are formed when the air comes in to contact with a heated surface. The gases collect on the garment as it is worn or stored, and color changes develop gradually. The heat necessary for deodorizing after dry cleaning can make the color change more apparent after the cleaning process.

The fabric manufacturer is responsible for selecting the special dyes that can minimize this problem. Once this color change develops, it’s usually permanent.

DeLuxe Dry Cleaners New Orleans Fume Faded

DeLuxe Dry Cleaners New Orleans Fume Faded 5

DeLuxe Dry Cleaners New Orleans Fume Faded 4

DeLuxe Dry Cleaners New Orleans Fume Faded 2

A brief history of Dry Cleaning…

A brief history of Dry Cleaning...

Professional garment care has been around since the Roman Empire. Cleaners were called “Fullers” back then, they used lye and ammonia as well as a type of clay called “Fuller’s earth” to absorb soils and greases from clothing too delicate for laundering.

The first published reference to the use of spirits or turpentine for removing atr and varnish was in 1690. It wasn’t until 1716 that turpentine (a distillation of pine pitch) began to be used as a “dry cleaner” to supplement the wet cleaning processes. Throughout the ages, tuperntine has had several names: oil of turpentine, spirits of turperntine, camphene, and “turps.”

Even before organic solvent was used to clean garments by immersion, a cleaner of clothes was known as a “Degraisseur.” The French name for a cleaner was “Teinturuer-degraisseur (a dyer-degreaser).

In the early 1900’s, drycleaners began using spirits of turpentine, called “camphene,” as a drycleaning solvent. The firm, Jolly-Belin in Paris, France, is credited with spearheading the firstr successful use of spirits of turpentine as a commercial drycleaning solvent. This discovery quickly spread to other countries on the continent and later to Britain.

The first use of a drycleaning soap was in Germany. In 1928, Stoddard solvent, which had a higher flash point than other solvbents currently being used was introduce. In 1932, chlorinated hydrocarbonds-nonflammable synthetic solvents-were introduced in the United States.

It’s cold outside, winter is here!

It's cold outside, winter is here!

Winter is here!…Our knees are knocking, and our teeth are chattering! As we’re all layering up to keep these cold weather symptoms at bay, your winter wear needs special care to ensure it lasts all winter long. Anything from cashmere scarves and sweaters, to wool coats and boots…It’s important to remember two key things:

For most cashmere pieces, dry cleaning is the preferred mode of cleaning so ALWAYS check the labels to see what they advise. If you can wash your cashmere at home, hand wash in cold water and dry flat. NEVER use the dryer or hot water as that can cause shrinkage. Drying on a hanger will cause stretching.

Wool is one of the best fabrics out there to keep you warm in the winter. For multicolor wool coats, or wool coats with another fabric like leather juxtaposed with the wool; trust your dry cleaner as you want to avoid any color bleeding that can occur during home care. Wool items usually cannot be washed, so do not try to clean at home if the label indicates “dry clean only”.

US engineers have created the “most waterproof material ever” – inspired by nasturtium leaves and butterfly wings.

Most clothes still need to be washed and or drycleaned… However, you would have no luck trying to clean anything made of this material! US engineers have created the “most waterproof material ever” – inspired by nasturtium leaves and butterfly wings.

The new “super-hydrophobic” surface could keep clothes dry and stop aircraft engines icing over, they say.

The lotus leaf was thought to be the gold standard for staying dry in nature, but now a team from MIT in Boston say they have surpassed it.

Adding tiny ridges to a silicon surface made water bounce off it 40% faster than the previous “limit”.

Similar ridges are found in nature on the wings of the Morpho butterfly and the veins of nasturtium leaves.

By applying these patterns to metals, fabrics and ceramics, the scientists hope to inspire a new generation of moisture-resistant products – from tents to wind turbines.

To view the full story, click on the following link.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-25004942

Excited for Thanksgiving 2013!

Excited for Thanksgiving 2013!

Is anyone else super excited for Thanksgiving? Don’t forget to bring us your clothes to get them looking extra good for Thanksgiving day!

http://www.deluxecleanersnola.com

Sweater Season

Sweater Season

Have you ever pulled out your favorite sweater and see that it has a pull or snag in it? Well its important to know that depending on the fabric, it can completely ruin the piece if not addressed! It is caused when something rough or sharp pulls at the fibers of your garment, these fibers are being stretched or removed from their normal fabric pattern. With woven knits, these pulls can actually be repaired invisibly, but make sure not to cut or pull them further, as that can create a hole.

When washing your sweaters, its incredibly important to pay attention to the tag on the garments. For finer sweaters like cashmere, angora or alpaca; they will all probably need to be dry cleaned. For those that are wool, cotton, linen, or acrylic; they should be hand washed and dried flat.

There’s a lot that can go wrong when trying to maintain your sweaters, so hopefully these tips help in keeping them looking their best!